Archives > August 2017

August – Message From the President

Read the full August eNews & President’s Message.

Advanced Care Planning – A Personal Perspective

Having an advanced care plan easily available to any health care professional—be it home care nurses, paramedics with EMS or nurses on an active care unit in hospital—is very useful. In our own clinic, we discuss a personal directive with every patient who has a review of their complex care plan. It would be good to include follow-up and incorporate a Green Sleeve to ensure completion of a personal directive. On reflection, why only during review of a complex care plan; why not incorporate this into an annual review with any patient?

I’ve recently had a very personal brush with legal documents such as Power of Attorney and Personal Directive. I was recognizing signs of illness in my own father and had embarked on obtaining these documents in a proactive manner. However, it may not have been truly proactive when one sees a family member deteriorating as proactive means doing this before something happens. My father then became seriously ill and was hospitalized quite suddenly before I had these documents ready. In the weeks following, I had to have documents transferred from my lawyer in Red Deer to a lawyer in Calgary, then have that lawyer meet with my father in hospital to get a Power of Attorney and Personal Directive in place. My father had the capacity to remain his own agent while this was being pursued, however, it could just as easily not have been the case. And, in all honesty, it was truly the Power of Attorney that was most important to my father. He was bedridden in hospital and could not look after his affairs (even though he knows the value of his bank accounts better than I know mine). Since having the Power of Attorney, I have looked after a tax installment, insurance payments and other bills, and my father is very relieved.

Is having the Green Sleeve on the refrigerator door the best place? I’m not sure. It needs be with the patient in question. I know of one case in which the family had done all the right things for a member of the family receiving palliative care. The Green Sleeve was on the door of the fridge, but this patient rapidly deteriorated, paramedics were called, but the Green Sleeve had disappeared (no one knows to where) and, as a result, there was no personal directive. A husband had to watch his terminally ill wife receive CPR when this was explicitly not her wish, yet there was nothing he could do.

The bottom line is to advocate with your patients to be proactive and explicit about advanced care planning and to have those plans readily available for when and where they are needed. It truly does provide a much higher quality of care for your patient.

Sincerely,
Dr. Fred Janke, BSc, MSc, MD, FCFP, FRRMS
President, Alberta College of Family Physicians
acfppres@acfp.ca

LeadFM Leadership Development Course: Primary Care Transformation

Primary Care Transformation: How to Tackle Sticky Situations We Were Never Taught to Address

October 20, 0800-1130
Brad Bahler, Nadine Letwin

Are you interested in leadership development?

Join Drs. Brad Bahler and Nadine Letwin as they present a half-day session before the PEIP Conference on October 20th. Their session, “Primary Care Transformation: How to Tackle Sticky Situations We Were Never Taught to Address will explore the “system transformation” element of the LEADS Framework.

In health care, we all eventually come face to face with problems outside our specific locus of control. These “system” problems in health care pose significant challenges to patients and primary care providers alike.

We will examine what is meant by systems transformation, expose participants to challenges that are rooted in our traditional mindset, and consider new approaches to problems we were never taught to solve. This session is part of the LeadFM Leadership Program.

There are only 30 spots available in this workshop, so head over here for more information or register for the session here.

 

Practising Wisely in Red Deer

Don’t Miss Out on this Upcoming Workshop on September 9th in Red Deer

The Alberta College of Family Physicians is proud to sponsor “Practising Wisely: Reducing Unnecessary Testing and Treatment,” an active learning workshop developed by the Ontario College of Family Physicians (OCFP) that focuses on too much medicine. It builds on the OCFP’s popular program “Don’t Just Do Something, Stand There!” and the Choosing Wisely Canada campaign.

When: September 9th 8:30 a.m. – 4:15 p.m.
Where: Red Deer Sheraton Hotel – 3310 50 Ave
Price: $600

Space is limited so be sure to Register Here

Find out more on PractisingWisely.ca

Participants will identify opportunities on how to “practise wisely”, with a focus on reducing over-prescribing, over-imaging, over-screening and over-monitoring using the latest evidence and tools from diverse sources. This workshop aligns closely with the Choosing Wisely Canada (CWC) campaign to implement good healthcare stewardship and avoid over-medicalization.

After active engagement in this full-day, deep dive into all 4 modules, participants will be better able to: Identify opportunities to reduce “too much medicine” Access and assess reliable, renewing online resources Integrate relevant evidence into individual patient care, and Communicate and build consensus with patients to reduce over-medicalization For more information on this and other CPD workshops, contact ACFP at cpd@acfp.ca.

PEER takes CPD Roadshows north to the Yukon

Together with the PEER Team, the Alberta College of Family Physicians is pleased to bring our CPD Roadshow to the Yukon this fall!

Based on the solicited feedback from local care providers and their identified topic areas, the inaugural Yukon and Rural North Conference (“Yu-Con”) brings together family physicians, residents, and students with their allied care colleagues (pharmacists, nurse practitioners, nurses) to learn, discuss, and share the latest studies on evidence-based medicine.

Similar in nature to the popular Practical Evidence for Informed Practice conference, “Yu-Con” features a day and a half of “quick snapper” sessions on a variety of primary care topics.

Yu-Con | Yukon and Rural North Conference
September 15-16, 2017 | Whitehorse, YT

This Group Learning program has been certified by the College of Family Physicians of Canada for up to 14.5 Mainpro+ credits.

More information is available for download. Registration is also available now.

Best Advice Guide: Team-Based Care in the Patient`s Medical Home

Team-based care is an integral part of the Patient’s Medical Home (PMH) model. The continuous, comprehensive, patient-centred care provided by these family practices is made even more effective by building a strong, well-connected team that strives for the same goal.

This guide examines the benefits of team-based care for both practice efficiency and patients’ health outcomes.

More Best Advice Guides

Presented and developed by the College of Family Physicians of Canada, the Best Advice Guides are short, practical documents designed to help family physicians implement the pillars of the Patient’s Medical Home in your practice.

Past guides are available on the PMH website and new guides are always under development and added to this library as they become available.

Join Us for the 6th Annual PEIP Conference

Don’t Miss Out!

PEIP Conference | October 20-21 | DoubleTree by Hilton West Edmonton

Focusing on relevant, evidence-based, and thought-provoking topics in health care that combine evidence, experience, and patient values, the Practical Evidence for Informed Practice (PEIP) conference is applicable to all primary care practitioners.

Back by popular demand – Live Webcast

The 2017 PEIP conference will be offered via live webcast for those who prefer to participate from the comfort of their own home or participate with colleagues from the office. Individual and group rates will be offered.

Conference Details

Download your official conference brochure for more information.

First Five Blog: Should You R3?

By Dr. Shan Lu

If you are in your second year of residency, you may be considering whether or not to do an R3. I had the same question in my second year and, to some extent, still do. This blog shares my personal story and links to the CFPC website for additional information about their Certificate of Added Competence (CAC) program.

First, the story. I became interested in the Care of the Elderly (COE) when I was in my second year of Family Medicine Residency. At the time, I was already five months pregnant with my first child. I had decided that I was interested enough in the field of COE that I would like to specialize in it, so I went ahead and applied for an R3. I was accepted and the University of Alberta even agreed to a deferred start date so I could have my maternity leave as planned.

As my deferred start date drew closer, I became increasingly aware of the difficulties I might face in balancing residency and a child under one year old. I wanted to get working (part-time at that). I had previously established enough connections in the COE field that helped me to land a related part-time position, and I’ve been working at a job I love, and learning in the field, since. Occasionally, I’ve consider returning to do a 6-month accelerated R3 in COE—mostly so that I could have the CAC behind my name.

Now the details. The CFPC currently only allows those who have completed an R3 program in the areas of COE, Sports and Exercise Medicine (SEM), Family Practice Anesthesia (FPA), Palliative Care (PC), and Emergency Medicine (EM). Newly approved domains are Addiction Medicine and Enhanced Surgical Skills.

The CFPC website states they are evaluating how people who have on the job learning could apply and be qualified for a CAC within their chosen field. For example, Emergency Medicine (EM) is a bit different, as you could gain enough experience on the job to then challenge the exam or to go through an R3 EM program. More details are available on their website: http://www.cfpc.ca/CAC/.

Everyone’s experience will be different but, here are some factors you may want to consider when deciding whether or not to do an R3:

  1. Your stage of life,
  2. If you can do the same job without the extra year or if the extra year is crucial to get into the field you like,
  3. How easily you would be able to obtain the CAC if you don’t do the R3 right after your R2 year.

Hope this has been helpful.